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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

Rolo just recently has seemed to become aggressive towards other dogs on leads!

But it only seems to be when either he or the other dog is pulled away? Its only come on in the last few weeks and is starting to concern me.

He will be having his plums removed soon but do you have any ideas on what this maybe?

Thanks Yall

Nealy
 

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My little spaniel is like this too & he's had his plums removed. has made very little difference - if at all. I don't think he'd actually hurt another dog, he is just showing them who is boss - well that's what I think it is anyway.

Sorry I can't offer any adivce, I am in a similar situation.
 

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No real help to offer but you say it happens when one or other is pulled away.

I wonder if he perceives the pull away as tension so reacts in a tense way??? Maybe try getting him to come away from the situation without either dog being pulled away to see if it makes a difference??
 

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Discussion Starter #4
He's being a little tinker at the moment, he went for the grandads dogs when they were minding their own business in their kennels!!!
 

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This is something often put down to 'bolshiness' in 'teenage years' and infact it is a warning shot across your bows. Any of this lunging and 'come on then' football yob type behaviour should not be put down to something that will pass in time. I know you are having him castrated but that probably won't change this as previously mentioned.

Basically he is a coward. He is doing this when the other dog cannot retaliate, he is not stupid They are on a lead or behind kennel doors. It CAN sometimes start out of fear aggression after a couple of attacks on him (depending on his genetic temeperament and confidence level will depend HOW many attacks or negative experiences need to take place before he starts to change and have this 'I will punch you before you punch me attitude).

What is of concern is that this sort of behaviour tends to escalate. What happens is it is a negative cycle because at some point he either does it to 'the wrong dog' and is seriously attacked or you get so tense at every dog that approaches, because you know what will or probably will follow from him, you completely renforce his idea that he must take charge of the situation and approaching dogs = need to be all macho and hard to prevent attack.

I would not underestimate that this will escalate. You will probably start to manage it better because you expect it but that doesn't help improve it at all. I really would just invest in a one to one session with a good behaviourist or experienced trainer whom you have explained what is starting to occur and she or he feels they can help you positively.

IF this dog has never had any real negative experiences, but has started behaving in this manner do not fool yourself into thinking 'he is just a dominant dog'. Infact he couldn't be further from it as a dominant dog would avoid a fight at all costs. He is a thug right now. Is starting to learn to be a bully.

Now you can fight fire with fire and take this situation properly and very formly immediately in hand. But I would very much strongly advise you to seek professional help with doing this as this is the shot over the bow you mustn't ignore, especially as it is become more common. Dogs are not protecting US when they are on the lead reacting this way, they are protecting THEM. he lacks socialisation with other canines it seems, even if you HAVE socialised him, more work needs doing under a controlled and relaxed environment. So get out with friends with sociable, easy going dogs as much as you can. let THEM off but keep him on just to see he is going to be manageable, then let him off somewhere nice and open with them to interact and have a good long walk without nagging at him. Do this as often as you can.

If he changes and does attack when offlead, or act as if he will, DEFINATELY seek help immediately and muzzle him until you can. Reason being vunerable dogs will be his 'prey'. Young dogs, dogs on leads, puppies and so he will quickly find himself in deep trouble if he goes for such dogs unmuzzled. So cover yourself and him.

This all sounds all terribly dramatic. Its only him being a bit of a bully... but this will escalate so use this time to work on this. If you don't, time will not heal this problem and walks will become a total headache.

Di
 

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Dont know if his health problems ie suspected OCD if I remember rightly would have anything to do with this? :? Sorry Neal I cannot remember his full diagnosis :?
 

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Did he have a lot of time at home as a youngster between about 5 aqnd 8 months of age? Because he was lame by any chance? On rest periods?

Di
 

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Nealy said:
Hi All,

Rolo just recently has seemed to become aggressive towards other dogs on leads!

But it only seems to be when either he or the other dog is pulled away? Its only come on in the last few weeks and is starting to concern me.

He will be having his plums removed soon but do you have any ideas on what this maybe?

Thanks Yall

Nealy
This is exactly what happens with my lab. But mainly with small dogs. (It seems to me that small dogs are more yappy and confrontational, around my area anyway). she is fine with other labs! :)

I was at training the other day and she went and sniffed a little dog. As soon as I pulled her away from it, she lunged at it and barked. It was definitely because i had pulled her away (as i do get nervous around small dogs with jayda), otherwise i think she might have been fine.

I have been to a behaviourist and she said she was being protective of me and its cos i tense up and avoid certain dogs on leads. I have now learnt to relax more, and there has been an improvement, although it's not totally gone away.

I have also changed small things at home like not giving her the whole run of the house , and also getting my partner to feed her aswell. I was told that she may see me as her only food source (as it was only me feeding her), so now we share feeding her, she might be less protective of me.

I know how you feel, and you are not alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Diana said:
Did he have a lot of time at home as a youngster between about 5 aqnd 8 months of age? Because he was lame by any chance? On rest periods?

Di
Thanks for all the info Di its really useful, he was never really lame when he was younger, he had the occasional slip where he slipped on the laminate flooring, but nothing that was cause for concern.

Missy J
Thats good to know, i do tend to tense up a little when approaching other dogs in anticipation of what i think will happen, il try to relax a little more!

Can anyone reccomend a behavior trainer in the east mids?
 

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Its lovely to think dogs are 'protecting us' but they tend to be protecting themselves and showing us that they lack self control and confidence in certain situations, so they fight fire with fire as being on the lead, they cannot use the 'flight' option.

Nealy I imagine you might have read my first long post and thought 'whatever! Reading WAY too much into it....' ;-) But glad you are going to try and find a behaviourist. Mind you reading some of the humaistic ways of thinking some seem to give as advice, be very aware of trying to find one with recommendations from people who have actually seen progress in their dogs from a particular person...

Best of luck
Di
 

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Whilst most of the time dogs are trying to protect themselves and i know jayda has low confidence with certain dogs, i do think it's true about dogs protecting us. Another dog jumped up on me once and Jayda had a go at him (no harm done though, just barks and a growl).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Rolo has always been confident with other dogs and it has only started recently, the sooner i can get it nipped in the bud the better!

It is nice to think they are protecting us though
 

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Seriously, try not to take too much pleasure in it or it will become an excuse which will stand between you realising this sort of thing can lead to real problems for you BOTH in the future.

If I wanted a dog to protect me I have to say i wouldn't have brought a Labrador. So any thoughts of them protecting me and me using that as any kind of comfort are a million miles from my mind. Aggression of any sort is not to be tolerated at any level, and when you have it, and want to do something about it, cut them NO slack of that kind - pretty please... ;-) ;-)

Wishing you every good bit of luck in stamping this out as fast as possible so you can get back to happy Rolo. Because a dog acting this way is not a happy dog 'upstairs'.

Di
 

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I think Di has given some very sane advice. Being at a training club where my trainer works A LOT with dog aggressive dogs, I can say it is an alarmingly common problem.

Cadbury, thankfully, is such a submissive, care-free chap, who has been nipped so many times by small dogs that you would think he should have the biggest phobia - but he is very good and in fact, when he is older and more confident my trainer has mentioned using him as a good socialiser with nervous dogs. He is also allowed to play with the little puppies :wink:

Back to topic, there is a dog at agility who has 'issues'. It is a little rescue terrier and it had problems with dogs, but unfortunately its owner is very quiet, timid, lacking in confidence and this feeds down to the dog. When an incident occurs (which it does) owner becomes defensive, little dog gets more stewed up and so things progress. It has also been said that in part this dog is protecting his owner - don't see this as a good thing, because now the little dog has started attacking strangers as well as other dogs.

So I think nip this problem in the bud quickly. I wish you good luck with it all :wink:
 

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Picked up a card from local fete today for the akna k9 academy

www.aknak9.com

they did fabby agility demo which had Luna hooked but noticed that on website and card it says the owner Rachael Bailey does Behaviour Correction too and has a qualification in animal psychology. Immediately thought of you. Can't recommend her as yet (will be enquiring about agility training classes!) but could be worth checking out website as she works 'your' side of Leicestershire and has seemingly worked with some pretty BIG aggressive dogs.
 

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" It has also been said that in part this dog is protecting his owner - don't see this as a good thing, because now the little dog has started attacking strangers as well as other dogs. "


Brilliant example Sophie. Dogs that we feel are protecting US are usually protecting themselves, BUT the example you given is perfect for the *other side of the coin*. They do feel they HAVE to protect us because our leadership is lacking and they feel someone has to hold the reins. This is a dangerous place to be because that will soon spill over into many other areas of ownership where the dog challenges us because he is starting to feel that 'someone' has to be 'gov' and if we aren't up to the job, it will HAVE to be him. Clear leadership doesn't have to be domineering or overpowering, but it has to be CLEAR.

Another bad place to be....

Di
 
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