Labradors Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok as I know you are all wonderful and experienced people on here i need advice.
My nana has end stages of altziemers and has been in a altziemer specialised care home the past 2 years or so. Before Christmas she was apparently suffering from flu. Very lethargic and sleeping all the time. She appeared to look very grey. Fast forward to last Monday and the manager decided to call in the doctor. Blood tests were done and the doctor ordered for an ambulance on the Tues as results show my nanas kidneys were functioning at 50% and she was extremely dehydrated. She is in hospital on ivft and having daily blood tests and scans on her kidneys. She keeps pulling her drip line out as she is confused at whats going on.
My question is, my nana pays £600 a week, yes, a WEEK on this care home to look after her, so how can she become so dehydrated?! The hospital are potentially keeping her in until the 27th. My mum doesn't know what to do or who to turn to about this. Surely the hospital should of picked up re the care home not pushing fluids?
If this was on the other foot, and nana was still being cared for by mum, the social would of been called immediately!
Thanks for reading
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
This is a heart-rending situation for you all and you have my sympathy. My mother died in 2008 and also had dementia. She was in a home for a while and the care wasn't good. My sister (who was on the spot) visited every day and kicked up a fuss. Things improved for a while and then deteriorated. In the end my amazing sister decided to have Mum live with her and cared for her for about 6 months till Mum passed away.

I'm not suggesting you do that as I wouldn't have been able to do it (I sent money and looked after Mum while my sister had a week away). But I do think you need to report the care home your nana is in as clearly she has been neglected. Is there any possibility of finding an alternate home for when she comes out of hospital? I realise this isn't simple.

Do hope your nana rallies and her care improves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for replying kaynine. It took my mum ages to find the right care home. My mum looked after her for as long as physically possible and my mum was close to a nervous breakdown over it all as she was emotionally drained.
I dont think there is any possibility she can live with my parents as the house is not the best designed for her.
I am wondering that if and when she does get discharged she will have to go into a nursing home due to the fact she cannot feed herself no longer due to the fact she forgets why she has picked the cuttlery up.
Its just a horrible situation to be in and wouldnt wish it on my worst enemy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,067 Posts
I really sympathise with you, I am in no way defending the nursing home but I have been in a similar place with a close relative and I've also got experience of caring for people with Alzheimer's. It can be very difficult to get someone to eat or drink in the later stages of this cruel disease. If she has been refusing or being reluctant to take adequate oral fluids over a long period of time there's not a lot other than IV therapy that will keep someone hydrated. Even then trying to stop them pulling the drip out is difficult and traumatic when having to resite the needle. There's a fine line between providing care and abuse, the best interests of the person has to be considered at all times which can sometimes look like neglect if it's decided to not continue treatment.
I would ask to have a meeting with the consultant caring for your grandmother and explain your concerns regarding her going back to the care home and wether it's a Safe Guarding issue in which case Social Services will be involved. As for the hospital discharging her on the 27th, that's a predictive discharge date and will not mean they will stop care on that date especially if there are concerns raised by the family.
It's a stressful situation, I hope your grandma recovers.
 
?

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
It can be very difficult to get someone to eat or drink in the later stages of this cruel disease.
It certainly can and there is only so much you can do to try to persuade them to.

My Mum was in a Residential Care Home for the last 2 years of her life, having suffered from Alzheimers for over a decade before that. By the time she went in, I could barely get her to eat 1/4 of a sandwich, or a few spoonfuls of soup; and if I got her to drink 1/2 a cup of tea, every few hours, I was lucky.

When she first went into the home, her eating and drinking picked up for a while, but it soon crashed again and there wasn't anything they could do, as they couldn't force feed her or put an IV in.

I'd ask for a meeting with the care home and find out what they CAN implement, once your Nana is back in their care. Also find out what their policies are for dealing with end stage patients. I know the home my Mum was in kept them comfortable, but once they reached a certain stage, allowed them to slip away with dignity, rather than full of tubes. I would imagine different homes have different policies though.

I feel for you all. It's a horrid, horrid disease, often more so for the family than the patient at the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,170 Posts
I agree with everything that Jules says.

My mum (who is nearly 94) has been in a care home for nearly two years now - she has severe mixed dementia (both vascular dementia and Alzheimers). Like your nan she is also sleeping most of the time now.

It is extremely difficult to get food or drinks down them when the disease becomes severe - but I have found that when certain carers are on she does much better than when those ones are off duty and others take over. But overall I am very happy with the care she receives. My battle at present is with the GP who wants to send her into hospital which is against my wishes and I know would be against my mother's wishes if she understood what is going on. I hope that when the time comes she will be able to slip away peacefully in familiar surroundings and with familiar people caring for her. I believe she is better cared for at the home than she would be on an elderly care hospital ward.

One thing I would suggest is that you ask for a full review of her care plan - which would give you the opportunity to express the family's concerns, and hopefully arrive at a positive way in which to move forward with each aspect your nan's future care.

In view of what has happened recently I would be requesting that the home keep a food/fluid chart which should be checked regularly and would ring alarm bells if levels are not adequate. The home should be offering drinks frequently throughout the day - and encouraging her to take some (even if it is only a little) rather than just putting the drink down and leaving her. If she's not responding when encouraged to eat - then a carer should be sitting next to her - and feeding her if necessary. But even with the best care in the world it can become very difficult to keep somebody with severe dementia properly hydrated and also getting food into them.

I hope that as a family you are able to talk together about your concerns, write down what you think are problem areas with regard to every aspect of her care, and then meet with the care home manager to hopefully sort things out in your nan's best interests.

Hugs xx
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,128 Posts
_Jules_ said:
I'd ask for a meeting with the care home and find out what they CAN implement, once your Nana is back in their care. Also find out what their policies are for dealing with end stage patients. I know the home my Mum was in kept them comfortable, but once they reached a certain stage, allowed them to slip away with dignity, rather than full of tubes. I would imagine different homes have different policies though.
.
Yes, my Mum has a similar end of life plan.

She is 93, has severe dementia, which she's had for six years. She sleeps 80% of the time and remembers nothing. We looked after her for four years, but there came a stage where we couldn't physically do it any more. Her food is pureed, but she swallows very little and drinks very little.

I am sure the home do the best they can. One of us visits her every day without fail. It's a small, friendly place.

['] for you Nicki, I feel for you :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
588 Posts
Disclaimer ...Nothing posted by me is an indication of negligence or wrongdoing.........

Okay here goes .............

I have an elderly parent in care home and I regularly encourage him to take fluids.I also have family members that work in the care profession.

Urinary and kidney issues can often associated with dehydration.

Some feel more should be done to ensure there is adequate monitoring of fluid intake. This could be done by keeping detailed litre related logs of daily fluids provided. I appreciate that it would not allow for residents who for example tip water down the sink but it would at least enable monitoring of provided fluids. Arguably routine urine tests could be completed also. That said many residents are reluctant to take on adequate fluids and/or take adequate food.

In meantime there is a sense in ensuring care plans are regularly reviewed and discussed with residents & relatives.

The article below gives an indication of the surface of the problem.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/10487305/More-than-a-thousand-care-home-residents-die-thirsty.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2327456/Grandmother-71-died-dehydration-care-home-gross-neglect-staff.html

I don't know full facts but generally speaking if a care provider fails in their duty then there could be cause for complaint. Bear in mind an upheld complaint can have potential consequences for individuals &/or organisations......Whilst they should all have an interest to care some may have an interest in damage limitation.

In extreme recourse there are steps that can be taken in relation to pursuing damages for care negligence and some specialise in this. Some offer no win no fee.........Do ensure that you consider costs re any no win no fee claims. I am not sure if all no win no fee firms work in the same way and fees can vary relative to the claim settlement. I would do significant research re fees, costs , share of awards etc if serious re going down this route.

Thoughts with you and your family

HTH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you so much everybody for replying.
My nana is doing much better in hospital and the nurses are fantastic.

In regards to the home, all we want is for my nana to get the best care possible. Compensation never entered our heads and the priority is that if and when she returns there, we need to prevent it from happening again.
The home rang my mum yesterday to ask how my nana was, and they commented that they couldnt understand how she became so dehydrated because theyd been pushing fluids.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top