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Hi I’m considering a black Labrador, we currently have a Lhasa Apso who is nearly 8. He is a lovely natured dog no aggression towards people or other dogs. I know Labradors need a huge amount more exercise we have 3 children at home 2 teenagers with loads of energy lol so exercise won’t be a problem as I love walking too. It’s more has anyone had experience introducing a Labrador to a similar breed? I’ve been reading tons of articles online but thought best to ask you guys as we obviously want to make sure we make a good decision. Any help or advice would be much appreciated. Thanks 😊
 

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It can work, but obviously it is a different thing meeting a dog when out walking to bringing another dog onto his territory. I've had Labradors not happy when I've brought another home, though they have soon got to accept the situation. I'm afraid it's something that you never really know until it happens. I always like them to meet out in the garden rather than the house, because it's a sort of halfway house between "My territory" and "Not my territory."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It can work, but obviously it is a different thing meeting a dog when out walking to bringing another dog onto his territory. I've had Labradors not happy when I've brought another home, though they have soon got to accept the situation. I'm afraid it's something that you never really know until it happens. I always like them to meet out in the garden rather than the house, because it's a sort of halfway house between "My territory" and "Not my territory."
No that makes sense, we were looking at getting the Labrador as a pup, we have the room to be able to give them both enough space to be on their own if need be. Just so nervous of making either dogs unhappy. Some friends have brought their dogs around mainly in the garden (but 1 has been in the house before covid obviously) and our Lhasa seemed ok he just took himself off when he had enough. i would introduce them outside on neutral ground and then read to walk them in the house together. There is so much to read 🙈
 

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I've got five at the minute, three Labradors, a foxhound and a flat coated retriever, and they all get along fine. Initially there can be a bit of sorting out, but it usually works out absolutely fine, with pup being accepted, if told off when being a bit too boisterous. At the minute, a lot of good breeders have put litters on hold as the price of pups has rocketed during the lockdown, and unscrupulous breeders are taking advantage of this. Pups don't need a lot of exercise initially, it's more play exercise, and when they can go out, short walks and getting them used to every day life outside the home and garden, mixed with a bit of basic training, so a pup/youngster won't need a lot of exercise until they are around a year old, and from there you can start to really build up fitness. I don't do a lot with my youngsters at all, I do basic training, recall, manners on lead and the sit/stop, if you can get those so they are as good as possible within the first 12 months, then you can build on those and introduce other training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've got five at the minute, three Labradors, a foxhound and a flat coated retriever, and they all get along fine. Initially there can be a bit of sorting out, but it usually works out absolutely fine, with pup being accepted, if told off when being a bit too boisterous. At the minute, a lot of good breeders have put litters on hold as the price of pups has rocketed during the lockdown, and unscrupulous breeders are taking advantage of this. Pups don't need a lot of exercise initially, it's more play exercise, and when they can go out, short walks and getting them used to every day life outside the home and garden, mixed with a bit of basic training, so a pup/youngster won't need a lot of exercise until they are around a year old, and from there you can start to really build up fitness. I don't do a lot with my youngsters at all, I do basic training, recall, manners on lead and the sit/stop, if you can get those so they are as good as possible within the first 12 months, then you can build on those and introduce other training.
Wow 5 😁 thanks for your advice 👍🏼 I know the prices have shot up haven’t they, to be honest we would prob look to try and get one either beginning of school hols (July) if we can. I’ve read the older dog can do this to the pup ie put them in their place is that true? Our Lhasa Apso was pretty easy to train ive read a lot recommend training classes so am prepared to take it to them also.
 

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Wow 5 😁 thanks for your advice 👍🏼 I know the prices have shot up haven’t they, to be honest we would prob look to try and get one either beginning of school hols (July) if we can. I’ve read the older dog can do this to the pup ie put them in their place is that true? Our Lhasa Apso was pretty easy to train ive read a lot recommend training classes so am prepared to take it to them also.
To be honest you're leaving it quite late to look for a pup for July, that may sound daft but the mere whiff of a nicely bred litter and they are snapped up quicker than you can ask. Have you looked at the sort of breeding you prefer? Working or show is the main split, with a lot of pet bred dogs about. You'll need to read up on health tests for parents, hip scores around or below the median of 9, and nice and even, so 4/4 is lovely, 9/0 isn't so good; elbow grade of 0 for both parents, and both should have a clear BVA eye certificate. At least one of the parents needs to be tested clear for prcd-PRA, CNM, EIC, HNPK and SD2. There's a lot of research involved in finding a good breeder, and you will find they often have good waiting lists for litters well in advance. Even if you don't plan on doing anything other than having a lovely companion, you still need to research for a breeder who does all the right things to try and ensure pups have the best chance of being healthy, good representatives of the breed.

It's not so much as they put them in their place, quite often times pups get away with blue murder, it's more of a crossing the line in other ways, so toys, food or even just if they don't feel in the mood then an older dog may tell the youngster they just don't want to share right at that point. But if a puppy is taking the liberty, then you need to step in and give your older dog somewhere safe where they can have some time to themselves. I have three generations currently, Grandma Tau is now 14 1/2 and her Granddaughter is 18 months, and she is as mad as a bag of badgers, when I feed them she takes off vertically to my shoulders in excitement, I'm not the tallest of people, but it's still an impressive feat. So when she gets a bit too much for Grandma I intervene and tell her no, and if I have to leave the house for a short time then Grandma gets left in the luxury of the sitting room, while the rest get the utility room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To be honest you're leaving it quite late to look for a pup for July, that may sound daft but the mere whiff of a nicely bred litter and they are snapped up quicker than you can ask. Have you looked at the sort of breeding you prefer? Working or show is the main split, with a lot of pet bred dogs about. You'll need to read up on health tests for parents, hip scores around or below the median of 9, and nice and even, so 4/4 is lovely, 9/0 isn't so good; elbow grade of 0 for both parents, and both should have a clear BVA eye certificate. At least one of the parents needs to be tested clear for prcd-PRA, CNM, EIC, HNPK and SD2. There's a lot of research involved in finding a good breeder, and you will find they often have good waiting lists for litters well in advance. Even if you don't plan on doing anything other than having a lovely companion, you still need to research for a breeder who does all the right things to try and ensure pups have the best chance of being healthy, good representatives of the breed.

It's not so much as they put them in their place, quite often times pups get away with blue murder, it's more of a crossing the line in other ways, so toys, food or even just if they don't feel in the mood then an older dog may tell the youngster they just don't want to share right at that point. But if a puppy is taking the liberty, then you need to step in and give your older dog somewhere safe where they can have some time to themselves. I have three generations currently, Grandma Tau is now 14 1/2 and her Granddaughter is 18 months, and she is as mad as a bag of badgers, when I feed them she takes off vertically to my shoulders in excitement, I'm not the tallest of people, but it's still an impressive feat. So when she gets a bit too much for Grandma I intervene and tell her no, and if I have to leave the house for a short time then Grandma gets left in the luxury of the sitting room, while the rest get the utility room.
Really I did not realise that, when I’ve looked online for breeders there seem to be a few but to be fair I would do a bit more research even if it meant us waiting that bit longer. Can you recommend any breeders at all? Aww that’s lovely 3 generations 😊
 

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I normally keep two, a young one to take over the work when it starts to get too much for the old one. (Not that the old one ever believes it's too much!)

Never be afraid to step in. Puppies are like children, they can get rougher and rougher as they get tired. A sharp, "Pack it in!" works wonders.

26708
 

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Really I did not realise that, when I’ve looked online for breeders there seem to be a few but to be fair I would do a bit more research even if it meant us waiting that bit longer. Can you recommend any breeders at all? Aww that’s lovely 3 generations 😊
There are very few out of the huge amount of litters where breeders have thoroughly researched the pedigrees and have used a good match for their bitch. A lot of breeders use their own dog, whether or not it's a good match, or the most convenient, or the one that gives them the right colour(s) that's convenient. The only two websites I'd suggest you look on are the UK Kennel Club, and Champdogs, and even then you have to research as a lot of those who advertise on there fall into the 'do no research' sort of breeders. Also make sure the health tests I mentioned are in place, I know on Champdogs they allow people to advertise using the Estimated Breeding Value, which is a figure calculated from dogs in the pedigree that have had hip scores/elbow grades, but is not a health test in it's own right, it's the probability of the dog to potentially have problems.

I think you need to look at what you want first, look at the type of dogs you like, do you like the working type, which can tend to be leaner and less substantial, or the show type, which are usually more substantial than the working type, and not necessarily as fast. There are dual purpose lines, my youngest girl has dual purpose lines in her pedigree, and for me, personally, I prefer the middle ground Labrador that isn't too heavy, and not too fine either. From there you can look at different pedigrees and decide what you like, and find a breeder or even a stud dog owner, who may be able to point you in the right direction of a planned litter, or even one on the ground if you're lucky. I'm on the waiting list for a litter that hasn't even been conceived yet, and it's full, with a reserve list.
 

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Hi I’m considering a black Labrador, we currently have a Lhasa Apso who is nearly 8. He is a lovely natured dog no aggression towards people or other dogs. I know Labradors need a huge amount more exercise we have 3 children at home 2 teenagers with loads of energy lol so exercise won’t be a problem as I love walking too. It’s more has anyone had experience introducing a Labrador to a similar breed? I’ve been reading tons of articles online but thought best to ask you guys as we obviously want to make sure we make a good decision. Any help or advice would be much appreciated. Thanks 😊
Just a few thoughts - we introduced a lab pup into the mix back in February, we have 2 older yorkies. Because of covid there was no option for gradual introductions so although we did the outdoors meet and greet it was brief! The first couple of days weren't good, with the eldest dog in particular flying at the poor pup several times. When this happened we did as John suggested and said pack it in very firmly to all three dogs. We did fuss pup if she felt particularly upset about it, but tried not to go over the top with scolding the terriers as we knew , given time, things would calm down and they have. There is now a tolerance, rather than friendship but things seem to improve week by week and of course Jas now towers over the other two and could flatten them both if she wanted, but being a lovely lab she wouldn't dream of it😀 What this does all mean for us though is that we've had to make an effort to introduce lots of other dogs to Jas - we don't want her thinking the dog world is made up of grumpy Yorkshire terriers! It's not necessarily an easy option, but it doesn't mean you should be put off, good luck.
 

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Our 3 year old Lab loves meeting other dogs but was quite put off by her new sister ( actually half- sister) when we brought her home at age 8 weeks-- all the nipping at her face and grabbing all the toys. One month in things are going much better
 

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Hi I’m considering a black Labrador, we currently have a Lhasa Apso who is nearly 8. He is a lovely natured dog no aggression towards people or other dogs. I know Labradors need a huge amount more exercise we have 3 children at home 2 teenagers with loads of energy lol so exercise won’t be a problem as I love walking too. It’s more has anyone had experience introducing a Labrador to a similar breed? I’ve been reading tons of articles online but thought best to ask you guys as we obviously want to make sure we make a good decision. Any help or advice would be much appreciated. Thanks 😊
my grandparents had a Maltese terrier rescue dog and a Labrador who got on great!!!!
 
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