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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Premise: I think I do understand all problems related to using harnesses on a Lab youngster, both related to the dynamics between the dog anf the human and also around the physical interferences with its gait/front legs. Until now I have tried teaching Baymax (now 6 months and 23.5 Kgs) to properly walk on a leash but recently he started pulling really hard when in the morning we go out to his park, so much that he hurt is throat and is now under meds for this irritation.

So for a few days, I really need to buy an harness to walk him without compression on his throat. At the same time I found a trainer school nearby and will get some help from them as on my own I'm not succeeding well/fast enough.

End of premise :)

What harness with at least a front attachment would you recommend? Googling I've read great reviews about this one https://www.dog-games-shop.co.uk/perfect-fit-fleece-dog-harness.html but I'm lost as to the proper sizes for my doggo (and planning to dismiss it hopefully in a couple of months).

Thanks in advance for the advice.
 

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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do agree John, that's why I'm going to enlist the help of a pro :) but at the same time I need to walk him in the next few weeks before we learn the proper dynamics with a normal leash.
 

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If you have to get one, get one that doesn't pull him off balance, ie the front leading ones, and that doesn't cut across joints. Pulling them off balance and cutting across joints is where harnesses can cause problems with gait, which can lead to other problems. However, a normal harness that fits around the legs and clips above the shoulders, will help him to pull more, so really, the answer is none, slip leads are much better. I manage three of mine at one go on slip leads, and one is a very, very giddy 2 year old; I'm over 50 now and not hugely strong.
 

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Premise: I think I do understand all problems related to using harnesses on a Lab youngster, both related to the dynamics between the dog anf the human and also around the physical interferences with its gait/front legs. Until now I have tried teaching Baymax (now 6 months and 23.5 Kgs) to properly walk on a leash but recently he started pulling really hard when in the morning we go out to his park, so much that he hurt is throat and is now under meds for this irritation.

So for a few days, I really need to buy an harness to walk him without compression on his throat. At the same time I found a trainer school nearby and will get some help from them as on my own I'm not succeeding well/fast enough.

End of premise :)

What harness with at least a front attachment would you recommend? Googling I've read great reviews about this one https://www.dog-games-shop.co.uk/perfect-fit-fleece-dog-harness.html but I'm lost as to the proper sizes for my doggo (and planning to dismiss it hopefully in a couple of months).

Thanks in advance for the advice.
Ok, so.......where to start on this one........I'm not going to drone on about all the various stages of my loose lead training with Jas, but here are the main points and where we are now, bearing in mind my experience sounds very similar to yours.
First few months very little in the way of formal lead training, lots of heel work in garden.
Introduced slip lead - possibly I didn't buy the best sort , anyway, she still pulled when she felt like it, same with using a traditional clip on lead, lots of choking despite following good advice about treating, stop/starting, turning round etc.
Things came to a head at her first training class where she was so excited that I felt physically unable to hold her, the trainer lent me a harness and it worked and I felt Jas was safer.
We bought a perfect fit despite my previous complete aversion to the whole idea of harnesses, at the same time I looked carefully at my training progress, because that's how I see it, I have as much to learn as Jas does! I'm putting more effort in and Jas now , most of the time, walks beautifully using the harness or a lead - John has mentioned before the need for a walk with our dogs to be about being together ,walking as a team, the pup enjoying our company. So to that end I do talk ALOT as we walk along, folk must think I'm bonkers 😀
I also use the so called high value treats as an incentive. We are making progress and I now look forward to our walks together. Hope this helps.
 

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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We're separated twins :)
All of this makes sense and kind of works SAVE for the first short walk to our field.
The road there is obligated, I cannot vary it, so the young imp has a strong association with the time of the day (I always walk him before I start to work and bring my kid to school) and path. So he's excited after spending the whole night at home and really goes bonkers.
In that specific situation there's no stopping and waiting (he'd keep on pulling forever I'm afraid) and little room to manouver in other directions since he's aiming like a compass to the start of our path in the field.
I recently stopped using treats and maybe will try using them again to quench this irresistible drive towards our walk.
Thanks a lot for your input.
 

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Why can't you vary it? Make the walk to the field a training exercise? Make it so you have start, stops, varying turn rounds so it's not just a straight 'pull my human along' to the field.
 

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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well guess I could give it a try :) And if I can I'll record a video of me dying while I attempt it ;)
 

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Well guess I could give it a try :) And if I can I'll record a video of me dying while I attempt it ;)
If I can walk three at one time, including a very enthusiastic two year old, I'm sure you can do it with the one ;)
 

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You may also have the slip leash in the wrong position, if you have a puller you need to ensure it’s right up behind the ears not around the throat where there’s a danger of doing damage. Also use a slip leash with an anti strangulation stop (which certainly seem to be more common in Europe). Eventually when you’ve mastered the dark art of heelwork, move it to a looser position. I’ve got two that can walk perfectly well at heel on a loose leash (we do rallyO so they have to) but at other times they still pull like steam trains. They also know exactly what to do when the show leashes come out though 🙄🤣🤣
 
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