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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a fantastic black Labrador who is now 9 months old. He and my ancient blind cat and I live a calm and harmonious life together except when visitors call or we are visiting friends. In both those situations he tends to jump up and pester people, taking a long time to settle. If anyone leaves the room the whole process starts again. When visiting for any length of time, beyond a cup of tea, I have tried taking a toy and his bed. We go to training and I follow the basic premise of only rewarding good behaviour, ignoring unwanted behaviour and use distraction as a technique. I also ask that other people ignore him so that he doesn’t get overexcited and ‘deaf’ until he is calm. Can anyone help? He is so amazing at home which gives me no opportunity to train for this unwanted behaviour. (I am very, very happy that he is so amazing at home)
 

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I think you've answered your own question, ie he's normally good with just you around, but goes ballistic when visitors arrive. To be fair, I have five currently, a mix of Labradors and a couple of other breeds, and after the initial mad five minutes they do settle down, but can pester a bit. I have a nine month old chocolate bitch, and she can be a bit giddy but learns to settle down after the initial excitement, but she has her moments. During lockdown and the last few months my neighbours have been regular visitors which has helped her get used to having people come round. I live quite rurally so don't get lots of opportunity to train for this, but on the odd occasion when family have driven over to visit they have behaved the same way, ie five minutes of madness then settling down with the occasional giddy moment when visitors are over. It may help that I've got older dogs who are used to being told to 'settle' ie calm down and just settle somewhere. One thing I do with my youngest Labrador when I take her out, is take her out with a good long chew, something like a buffalo ear to keep her busy so she doesn't get overly excited, which worked for a while last night at the pub, but then Rolo, another chocolate Labrador who is known for his foodiness, picked the half eaten ear up when Weft dropped it in a moment of excitement. She was still pretty good, the occasional moment of madness but not bad for a youngster not used to busy places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for taking the time to reply. He doesn’t go ballistic, just wanders around occasionally jumping up at people who are eating therefore being a bit of a pest. I am wondering if anyone has any specific training for that kind of behaviour. I’ve never used a buffalo ear but it sounds like it could be irresistible, so will try.
 

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I have to say with my girls, they sit on my knee and jump all over me playing bitey face, which is fine, but with visitors thankfully they don't. If I've got food it's another matter, they are definitely not allowed to jump up when I've got food. If there's any left over then they sometimes get a treat, but it's after I've finished and in a controlled order, even the foxhound behaves when I've got food and she's the worst by far for being foodie. Buffalo ears are great as they last a good 20 mins, pizzles are even better but in short supply these days.
 

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What method do you use to stop them jumping on you when you have food?
I just tell them 'No', perhaps they sense someone who's used to dealing with dogs and someone who isn't? I had a rather fabulous sirloin steak with veggies and a creamy sauce for tea, and, being a slob tonight, I had it on the sofa with it on a plate on the arm of the sofa, and some very hungry eyes watching me. Not one of them would dare try and get in there.
 

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I had a sirloin steak marinating in damson vodka on the work top a while back. Chloe put her feet up on the work top and stole . . . . . . . . . . the oven glove! But then, I dont think that dog's elevator reaches the top floor!! o_O
With a rescue foxhound who lived wild for a good few months before finally ending up with Foxhound Welfare, I know just how foody a dog can be. She once stole a rabbit casserole out of the oven while it was cooking.
 
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