Labradors Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone! Newbie here. I have an 8 month old fox lab who has always been a bit on the wild side. I’ve done a huge amount of training with her and on the whole she’s making good progress. There are a couple of sticking points tho, one is other dogs coming to the house. I have lots of friends who like to visit with their dog but at the moment it’s a really stressful experience as my big pup gives the visiting dog no peace. All listening stops, she jumps on them, hurts them, plays far too roughly and does not listen to their corrections. I intervene stop her, put her on the lead etc but she sits and whines, pulls and is basically a total nuisance trying to get to the other dog.
I will often end up isolating her in another room. My mum is possibly coming to live with me and her 9 year old more grumpy dog. How do I get her to calm down around other dogs?

Just to clarify I can get her to walk past other dogs, she has great recall etc. Its mainly in the house and is especially bad with a couple of my friends dogs who she simply loves (they tolerate her!)

I don’t want her hurting another dog (or human) or getting aggressively bitten because she doesn’t know when to calm down. Help!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,241 Posts
I dont think you are going to like this, but I have to say it, "Take Charge." At 8 months old she is still a puppy, but is big enough and strong enough to do some damage. A friend's Flatcoated Retriever was around that age when she "body checked" her old dog and broke his leg! OK, it was out in a field where the ground did not allow the leg to move away. Had it been indoors the dog would probably only have rolled over. But when it comes to dogs and humans, for the safety of the dog the human MUST be in charge. When we say "Jump" our dogs should be saying "How high?" There is no need to get heavy handed about it, but your voice your dog should realise that it has overstepped the mark. One problem women have is a higher pitched more gentle voice in comparison with a man, so men tend to sound more authoritive. Cultivating a "Fish wives' voice can help make, "OIE, Cut that out or I'll seperate you from your breath!" sound more commanding
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,441 Posts
I don't care if she whines I'm afraid, I have five boisterous dogs, well, three boisterous Labradors, a rescue foxhound who wouldn't dare approach a visitor (unless a dog) and an FCR who is a bit too much of a swot to misbehave most of the time. Depending on who is coming round, whether they know my dogs and are used to them, I will put some away, particularly the young Labradors who can be a bit overwhelming if someone isn't as firm as me, and they can be slowly introduced once it's all settled down. It is not up to other dogs to tell your dog off, I'm afraid that's a misconception that a lot of people hold, and yes, it does happen, my fabulous old girl now sadly gone was a great leveller for all dogs that came into the household, if they pushed their luck she told them where to put it. So I would be asking myself (in your position) have I got the experience to really tell my youngster what is acceptable or not, and if I didn't feel I had, I'd be looking for someone to help, a good dog trainer actually trains the handler.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top