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Hi there

We have a 7 month old female black lab who still mouths pretty bad.we have tried the usual things like grabbing her mouth and closing it whilst saying no and ignoring her but she still does it.

I was wondering if this is normal lab behaviour or are there any other techniques that we could try

Thanks

Lynne

:p [/i]
 

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Hi Lynne,

There's another post on here at the moment, regarding play biting & mouthing. (regarding slightly younger pups i think)

Personally, i would say that labradors continue their puppish ways for quite a considerable amount of time, i wouldn't be over concerned on that score, however, obviously you want to nip it in the bud ASAP - have you tried any other methods apart from the holding muzzle shut?

I think someone else mentioned on here about being really firm, i would second this, make sure she really knows who's boss, and don't be afraid to be very firm with her. Our pup Bradley went through a stage of not listening to me, but he would my husband, so i have had to toughen up my act a little so he knows who is boss, and he is now as good as gold with the both of us.

Let us know how you get on...hope she gets out of this habit for you.

Anyone else have any more advice for Lynne?
 

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mouthng

Jack was three years old maybe a little older when he came to live with us after being a stray and very mouthy. At the time he was about 89 pounds and a wee bit full of himself.

One strategy I read about in a book the title I cannot now recall suggested making a fist and gently but firmly shoving it into the dog's throat. Right. I'm going to voluntarily put my hand into the shark's jaws. Since he was gobbling up my hands anyway, I tried it. When Jack grabbed ny hand I mad a fist, shoved it down his throat telling him firmly "NO BITE!" and waited for him to clamp down. Jack did not like the fist in the mouth and moved away as quickly as he could and after a few more times realized mouthing was not acceptable and that was the end of it.

HTH
 

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I also have a problem with my lab biting but he is only 9 weeks old so it's slightly different. A tip I read is when your dog bites you, yelp and turn around quickly as if you are in pain, because when in their litters this is how their brothers and sisters would have reacted to a hard bite and the biting would become much more gentle after this or cease all together. It takes time but I have noticed a decrease in biting from using this technique! Hope this helps :)
 

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The yelp works very well - but you have to be firm and ignore them.

I notice with poppy (and recall from my first lab) they repond very well to firm and consistent behaviour and you really cant shy away from being rough - verbally or occassionally physically (short sharp shock) to get your message accross.

Most of the little challenges I am having is with other people. They don't behave consistently towards the dog in the way you want them to (even when you have asked them to) and the dog can't help getting mixed messages. I can't expect them 2 but nonthless it does make training less efficient and i feel for the little blighter trying to make sense of it all !

Dogs are not stupid - if you watch your dog in the presence of another that is either stronger/bigger or more self-assured, your dog instinctively knows exactly how to behave and approaches them submissively, or prepared to submit very quickly if need be. The other dog will look menacing, growl, go to bite or bite your dog - we probably need to do the same - they understand the process - it is hard wired into their brains.

The other dogs watching this "natural" behaviour dont say the doggy equivalent of "aaagh" in a sloppy voice when the more dominant dog exerts that dominance and your dog rolls over, crouches, or sculks off - so we probably shouldn't do that as humans whn the hound has done something wrong.

I spend more time explaing to my partner and daughter that im not being cruel when i tap poppy across the nose, ball "NO" and/or remove her from our presence for 5 mins when she misbehaves than it takes for the puppy to accept her "reprimand" and move on !

It is amazing how many expert dog triners there are out there all trying their own techniques on your dog until they are bored or bore you to death !

I have a baby coming in a couple of weeks so I guess this is all good practice for keeping my mouth shut when everone wants to bring her up and i am viewed as the spawn of satan if I don't follwo every bit of advice i have rammed down my throat !
 

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A Lab can mouth until they are about 9months old, They do this because of the teething and the pain associated with it. No need to tap noses or smack, just take the offending object away from them, ie your hand. If you shout or even say anything to the pup, they are getting what they want, attention. good or bad it is still attention. It is quite easy to stop them mouthing, take the offending object away and give them something to chew. I have found that a wet facecloth knotted and placed in the freezer and then give to the pup not only gives them something to chew but also cools down the hot and painful gums.
Kay
 

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nothing to do with the subject .I just wanted to say how hilarious i find Bradleys photo ! Everytime i see it i laugh out loud.It should be put on a hallmark card .Brilliant ! :lol:
 

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have to say I havent been on for a while, its amazing how much Bradley has Grown, love the photo :lol: He is gorgeous
Kay
 

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Dylan still mouths me and he is 16 months old,ben still mouthed me till we lost him and he was 13,he used to mouth me walking down the road and sometimes would have my hand in his mouth for ages,labradors make up their own rules.Lynne.
 
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